marfmellow:

I have false lashes on today - they were easier this time, I’ve found that the trick is to let the glue dry a little before trying to apply so it’s more gummy. 

also, I have a beef jerky shirt on. 

amandaonwriting:

Using Myths for Writing Prompts

Writing prompts are an excellent way to stay in good writing shape. We post a daily writing prompt on our Facebook page. It is also available on our Creative Blog
If you’re looking for some inspiration, you may enjoy an article I wrote last year about using Lyrics as Writing Prompts. I am always looking for new writing exercises, and I wanted to explore the concept of myths as prompts. I think this could be a great exercise for your writing group.
What is a myth?
A myth is a traditional, usually ancient story involving supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes. It is used to explain aspects of the natural world or to show the psychology, customs, or ideals of a society. Myths exist in every culture across the globe. Examples include Eros and Psyche, the Myth of CreationDaedalus and Iccarus,Noah and the Great Flood, the myth of Arthur and Camelot, and The Rain Queen.
Why don’t you write a myth using one of these ideas as inspiration?

writing

delilahsdawson:

ladyattercop:

Katie Brumbach was one of fourteen children born to circus performers Philippe and Johanna Brumbach. In her early years, Katie performed with her family. Katie’s father would offer one hundred marks to any man in the audience who could defeat her in wrestling no one ever succeeded in winning the prize. It was during one such performance that Katie met her husband of fifty-two years, Max Heymann.

Brumbach once defeated the famous strongman Eugene Sandow in weightlifting contest in New York. Katie lifted a weight of 300 pounds over her head, which Sandow only managed to lift to his chest. After this victory, she adopted the stage name “Sandwina” as a feminine derivative of Sandow.

Sandwina worked in the United States with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus for many years, until she was nearly 60. One of her standard performance feats was lifting her husband (who weighed 165 pounds) overhead with one hand. She performed many other feats, such as bending steel bars and resisting the pull of four horses. Sandwina’s record stood for many years until being eclipsed by women’s weightlifter Karyn Marshall in 1987.

Text from her Wikipedia page.

Criminy’s Caravan needs a strongwoman…

history, inspiration

hellyeahrihannafenty:

MISSING: Ataui Deng has been missing for 10 days. She was last seen in the Lower East Side of New York City. She is 5 feet 10 inches tall and slim. If you see her please email FindAtaui@gmail.com. Thank you

michaelaross:

The First African-American Detectives, The Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case, and the Fate of Reconstruction

When police departments in the mid-twentieth-century appointed African-American detectives, the nation took note.  Through countless books, movies, and television shows, detectives had become the most glamorous figures in law enforcement, and the appointment of black detectives—first in the North and then in the South—was seen as a sign of a transforming society. Sidney Poitier’s portrayal of Philadelphia homicide detective Virgil Tibbs in the 1967 film In the Heat of the Night became iconic. But few commentators noted at the time that the trailblazing African- American detectives of the Civil Rights Era were not the first black detectives in American History. That honor goes to the black “special officers,” as detectives were often called, who served in a handful of cities in the South during Reconstruction.  In Reconstruction-era New Orleans, for example, John Baptiste Jourdain, Jordan Noble, and other black detectives investigated high profile crimes including the Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case of 1870.

Until the mid-1840s, American urban police forces did not employ detectives at all; before then, the role of policemen, night watchmen, and town constables was to prevent crimes, not to solve them. Cities usually depended on common citizens to identify criminals. Even with the rise of professional policing in the 1830s, officers focused their energies on prevention and made most arrests based on evidence that witnesses had voluntarily brought forth. After Boston introduced the first detective squad in 1846, other American cities, including New Orleans, followed suit, and detectives soon became celebrated figures. Stories, both real and fictional, of whip-smart sleuths deciphering clues, using disguise, spotting telltale signs, and outsmarting wily criminals captured the American imagination. True crime tabloids like the National Police Gazette, as well as the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, helped propel the national obsession with detective work.

But until Reconstruction, all police detectives in the United States
had been white. Even in 1870, police departments in the North still had not hired black patrolmen, let alone detectives. The Boston force would not add a black officer until 1878; in New York City, the ranks remained all-white until 1911. But in the South, five cities employed black officers. Reconstruction, it seemed, had brought real change; only a few years earlier, the idea of a black man serving on a southern police force in any capacity would have been unthinkable. But in 1870 in New Orleans, black detectives followed leads, interrogated white and black witnesses, and used their deductive skills in efforts to solve sensational crimes like the Great New Orleans Kidnapping Case.  More was at stake, of course, than simply solving crimes.  If they succeeded, black detectives could help convince skeptical whites that biracial government could work.  If they failed, however, they would arm the critics who demanded the restoration of white supremacy.

history, inspiration

gowns:

a handful of carl van vechten’s gorgeous kodachrome portraits

  1. martha flowers, 1953
  2. diana sands, 1963
  3. alvin ailey, 1955
  4. joyce bryant, 1953
  5. leontyne price, 1953
  6. mahalia jackson, 1962
  7. james earl jones, 1961
  8. zora neale hurston, 1940
  9. harry belafonte, 1954
  10. james baldwin, 1954

dyehardblackhair:

ayababibi:

Today’s #motd featuring lilac eyeliner from Sleek Cosmetics and 2am eyeshadow from @sugarpill. Really need to get some more from them! I’m getting better at doing my brows too, lol, I’ve always considered them a makeup weakness. What’s your makeup weakness?

*