TELL NBC THAT CONSTANTINE IS BISEXUAL

euclase:

I normally wouldn’t post this on my art blog, but I am outraged. I had big hopes for NBC’s Constantine. Like make room on the drawing table because I need to draw 100 more trenchcoats hopes. Supernatural-themed shows, movies, and comics are my absolute passion. I am an [insert show of your choice] fan because I am a Hellblazer fan. 

But more than that, I am a queer fan. And John Constantine is a queer character. It’s one thing to grow up without seeing LGBTQIA characters in my favorite shows and movies, let alone see them represented with dignity and respect. But it’s quite another thing to find that a canonically queer character you love has been straightwashed, and that is what NBC is doing with Constantine.

There is no justification good enough for why this character can’t be bisexual. We need to tell NBC that we want John Constantine’s bisexuality to be recognized.

If you want to contact the show, you can reach their Twitter [@NBCConstantine​ ] or email them directly [and select Constantine under “Questions not found on FAQ page”].

NBC, please DO NOT take this queer character away from us.

shwetanarayan:

There’s a certain audacity required to write. There’s an audacity in believing that the story in your head, which is an extrapolation of something held as a deeper truth, might be interesting or important to anyone but you. There’s an audacity in believing that you can accurately transfer that story-truth into words on a page, and that those strung-together words will also be something beautiful. From where does this audacity arise? How do you develop a belief in yourself so strong that it can see you through to the end of a poem or the conclusion of a novel?

Adding this quote (bolding mine) from a bit later, because SO MUCH YES:

Why should parents have to embark on a literary research project and discard their televisions in order to create diversity in their children’s lives, to show their children that the world values people who look or talk or dream like they do? The audacity to write is harder to muster when you don’t believe you are valued.

So, I'm writing a story (My first!) and I have soooo many ideas for this fantasy world that I'm building. What is the best way that you've found to organize your ideas? Also, I'm worried about not having enough rules for the characters and the plot to abide by, because I feel like with all these concepts that I want to include in the story, there are too many loop holes, and too many abilities that my characters have to produce a serious conflict or center the plot on a single goal. Thoughts?
AnonymousAsked by Anonymous

writing-questions-answered:

Here’s how I plan, and here’s how to find focus during a storm of ideas. Read how to give your story a purpose will help you organize your plot a bit. Just try to narrow abilities down a bit and tie up some of those loop holes, and things will look a lot better. :)

stephengaffney:

Law of the Leg.” When drawing the leg, its important to remember that they all have a rhythms that correspond to the rest of the body. Your upper thigh/quadriceps, no matter how thin the person may be, will always push slightly outwards. Where as the lower leg/calf muscle, in response to the thigh, will curve in the opposite direction. Here we see a lovely example of “opposite C’s.” The knee takes a slightly flat angle linking these two “C’s.” This is because of the patella, that this illusion takes place. Don’t forget that the Glutes rest a top the thigh, so please be sure to have good hierarchy to suggest this. Have a look at some examples above that illustrate these points!

© Stephen Gaffney 2012

diasporicroots:

Thomas Fuller 1710 - 1790 , African “slave” and mathematician. 
Thomas Fuller was an African, shipped to America as a slave in 1724. He had remarkable powers of calculation, and late in his life was discovered by antislavery campaigners who used him as a demonstration that blacks are not mentally inferior to whites. 
The place of his birth appears to have been between present day Liberia and Benin. Known as Negro Tom, we know that he was described as a very black man and also we know that he lived in Virginia after being brought to the United States as a slave.Certainly late in his life he was the property of Elixabeth Coxe of Alexandria. 
Thomas Fuller, known as the Virginia Calculator, was stolen from his native Africa at the age of fourteen and sold to a planter. When he was about seventy years old, two gentlemen, natives of Pennsylvania, viz., William Hartshorne and Samuel Coates, men of probity and respectable characters, having heard, in traveling through the neighborhood in which the slave lived, of his extraordinary powers in arithmetic, sent for him and had their curiosity sufficiently gratified by the answers which he gave to the following questions: First, Upon being asked how many seconds there were in a year and a half, he answered in about two minutes, 47 304 000. Second: On being asked how many seconds a man has lived who is 70 years, 17 days and 12 hours old, he answered in a minute and a half 2 210 500 800. One of the gentlemen who employed himself with his pen in making these calculations told him he was wrong, and the sum was not so great as he had said - upon which the old man hastily replied: stop, master, you forget the leap year. On adding the amount of the seconds of the leap years the amount of the whole in both their sums agreed exactly.
Another question was asked and satisfactorily answered. Before two other gentlemen he gave the amount of nine figures multiplied by nine. … In 1790 he died at the age of 80 years, having never learned to read or write, in spite of his extraordinary power of calculation. 
Present day thinking is that Fuller learned to calculate in Africa before he was brought to the United States as a slave. Supporting evidence for this comes from a passage written by Thomas Clarkson in 1788 describing the purchase of African slaves:  “It is astonishing with what facility the African brokers reckon up the exchange of European goods for slaves. One of these brokers has ten slaves to sell , and for each of these he demands ten different articles. He reduces them immediately by the head to bars, coppers, ounces… and immediately strikes the balance. The European, on the other hand, takes his pen, and with great deliberation, and with all the advantage of arithmetic and letters, begin to estimate also. He is so unfortunate, as to make a mistake: but he no sooner errs, than he is detected by this man of inferior capacity, whom he can neither deceive in the name or quality of his goods, nor in the balance of his account.” 
Despite Fuller’s calculating abilities he was never taught to read or write and again this is evidence that he did not learn to calculate while in the United States. When someone who had witnessed his calculating abilities remarked that it was a pity he had not been educated, Fuller replied: ‘It is best I got no learning; for many learned men be great fools.’  He died on 1790 in Alexandria, Virginia, USA.
Click here for more: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/031508609090050N

diasporicroots:

Thomas Fuller 1710 - 1790 , African “slave” and mathematician.

Thomas Fuller was an African, shipped to America as a slave in 1724. He had remarkable powers of calculation, and late in his life was discovered by antislavery campaigners who used him as a demonstration that blacks are not mentally inferior to whites. 

The place of his birth appears to have been between present day Liberia and Benin. Known as Negro Tom, we know that he was described as a very black man and also we know that he lived in Virginia after being brought to the United States as a slave.Certainly late in his life he was the property of Elixabeth Coxe of Alexandria. 

Thomas Fuller, known as the Virginia Calculator, was stolen from his native Africa at the age of fourteen and sold to a planter. When he was about seventy years old, two gentlemen, natives of Pennsylvania, viz., William Hartshorne and Samuel Coates, men of probity and respectable characters, having heard, in traveling through the neighborhood in which the slave lived, of his extraordinary powers in arithmetic, sent for him and had their curiosity sufficiently gratified by the answers which he gave to the following questions: First, Upon being asked how many seconds there were in a year and a half, he answered in about two minutes, 47 304 000. Second: On being asked how many seconds a man has lived who is 70 years, 17 days and 12 hours old, he answered in a minute and a half 2 210 500 800. One of the gentlemen who employed himself with his pen in making these calculations told him he was wrong, and the sum was not so great as he had said - upon which the old man hastily replied: stop, master, you forget the leap year. On adding the amount of the seconds of the leap years the amount of the whole in both their sums agreed exactly.

Another question was asked and satisfactorily answered. Before two other gentlemen he gave the amount of nine figures multiplied by nine. … In 1790 he died at the age of 80 years, having never learned to read or write, in spite of his extraordinary power of calculation. 

Present day thinking is that Fuller learned to calculate in Africa before he was brought to the United States as a slave. Supporting evidence for this comes from a passage written by Thomas Clarkson in 1788 describing the purchase of African slaves:  “It is astonishing with what facility the African brokers reckon up the exchange of European goods for slaves. One of these brokers has ten slaves to sell , and for each of these he demands ten different articles. He reduces them immediately by the head to bars, coppers, ounces… and immediately strikes the balance. The European, on the other hand, takes his pen, and with great deliberation, and with all the advantage of arithmetic and letters, begin to estimate also. He is so unfortunate, as to make a mistake: but he no sooner errs, than he is detected by this man of inferior capacity, whom he can neither deceive in the name or quality of his goods, nor in the balance of his account.” 

Despite Fuller’s calculating abilities he was never taught to read or write and again this is evidence that he did not learn to calculate while in the United States. When someone who had witnessed his calculating abilities remarked that it was a pity he had not been educated, Fuller replied: ‘It is best I got no learning; for many learned men be great fools.’  He died on 1790 in Alexandria, Virginia, USA.

Click here for more: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/031508609090050N